Employee Benefits Law Report

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IRS Safe Harbor for accepting rollover contributions – Revenue Ruling 2014-9 and Form 5310

The Form 5310 Application for Determination for Terminating Plan instructions, updated in December 2013, added an odd and time-consuming new requirement, “Submit proof that any rollovers or asset transfers received [during the year of plan termination and five prior plan years] were from a qualified plan or IRA (for example, DL [determination letter] and timely … Continue Reading

Substantial risk of forfeiture guidance clarifies when Section 16 short-swing profit liability can defer taxation of equity compensation awards

Legend had it at my law school that one day, a lost student walked into a torts class and asked the professor if this class was wills, trusts, and estates. The torts professor replied, “We haven’t gotten that far yet.” A dry sense of humor on the professor’s part? Perhaps. His point, however, was that … Continue Reading

“Substantial Risk of Forfeiture” Clarification Impacts Restricted Property (Stock) Grants

As complex as the Internal Revenue Code is, many people still assume that the rules contain a great deal of specificity and precision, perhaps because of the mathematical nature of calculating taxes. They often are surprised to learn that the Code leaves a lot of room for discretion and subjectivity. A great example of this subjectivity is Code Section 83’s regulations governing the taxation of restricted stock (and other property). The underlying stock subject to these grants generally does not become taxable to the employee until the stock no longer is subject to a “substantial risk of forfeiture.” As you might guess, whether a risk is “substantial” can be quite a subjective determination.… Continue Reading

United States v. Windsor: Where Is My Money! Obtaining Tax Refunds for Same-Sex Spouse Benefits

It is hard to believe that nearly five months have passed since the United States Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in United States v. Windsor. As a reminder, the Supreme Court held that the provisions contained in the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”) that exclude same-sex relationships from the definition of marriage and spouse for federal law purposes (i.e., Section 3 of DOMA) are unconstitutional. The broad impact of this holding is clear: for purposes of federal law (e.g., ERISA, the Internal Revenue Code, etc.), same-sex marriages must be treated the same as opposite-sex marriages. But, while the general effect is clear, the Supreme Court’s decision left many questions unanswered. … Continue Reading

Same-Sex Marriages Recognized for Federal Tax Purposes

The United States Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (the “Agencies”) yesterday announced that same-sex couples who were legally married in jurisdictions that recognize same-sex marriages (i.e., either in states within the United States, United States territories or in other countries) will be treated as married for federal tax purposes. … Continue Reading
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